This page presents the timeline of events at Treblinka extermination camp during the most deadly phase of the Holocaust in World War II.[1][2][3][4][5]. All deportations were from German occupied Poland, except where noted. In most cases the number of deportees are not exact figures, but rather approximations. Days are listed in chronological order, nevertheless, a number of dates are missing from the below tables which means only that no way bills survived for those particular dates. It does not mean that transports were not arriving or have not been processed from layover yards, when applicable.

Sources:
wikipedia.org/Timeline of Treblinka extermination camp

Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center

 

Day # Date Number of deportees Deported from Cumulative total deportees Known deportees Major Events
July 7, 1942 Commandant Irmfried Eberl writes to Heinz Auerswald that Treblinka will be ready to start operations on July 11, 1942.
1 July 22, 1942 6,500 Warsaw Ghetto 6,500 First deportation from Warsaw Ghetto.
2 July 23, 1942 7,300 Warsaw 13,800 Treblinka becomes fully operational.
3 July 24, 1942 7,400 Warsaw 21,200
4 July 25, 1942 7,530 Warsaw 28,730
5 July 26, 1942 6,400 Warsaw 35,130
6 July 27, 1942 6,320 Warsaw 41,450
7 July 28, 1942 5,020 Warsaw 46,470
8 July 29, 1942 5,480 Warsaw 51,950
9 July 30, 1942 6,430 Warsaw 58,380
10 July 31, 1942 6,756 Warsaw 65,136
11 August 1, 1942 6,220 Warsaw 71,356
12 August 2, 1942 6,276 Warsaw 77,632
13 August 3, 1942 6,458 Warsaw 84,090
14 August 4, 1942 6,568 Warsaw 90,658
15 August 5, 1942 6,623 Warsaw 97,281 Hillel Zeitlin
15 August 5, 1942 30,000 Radom Ghetto 127,281 First train of ghetto liquidation action lasting for two weeks with cumulative number of victims.
16 August 6, 1942 10,085 Warsaw 137,366 Janusz Korczak and 200 orphans Fahrplananordnung Nr. 548; Warsaw – Treblinka.[6][7] One of daily transports (58 freight cars and 2 passenger cars).
17 August 7, 1942 10,672 Warsaw 148,038 The German food giveaway creates backlog at the unloading ramp. Four transports in two days can not accommodate people lining up at the Umschlagplatz for several days to be "deported" as first, in order to obtain bread.[8]
18 August 8, 1942 7,304 Warsaw 155,342
19 August 9, 1942 6,292 Warsaw 161,634
20 August 10, 1942 2,158 Warsaw 163,792
21 August 11, 1942 7,725 Warsaw 171,517
22 August 12, 1942 4,688 Warsaw 176,205 Luba Lewin
23 August 13, 1942 4,313 Warsaw 180,518
24 August 14, 1942 5,168 Warsaw 185,686 Hanna Katznelson
25 August 15, 1942 3,633 Warsaw 189,319
26 August 16, 1942 4,095 Warsaw 193,414
27 August 17, 1942 4,160 Warsaw 197,574
28 August 18, 1942 3,926 Warsaw 201,500
29 August 19, 1942 4,000 Warsaw 205,500
29 August 19, 1942 6,500 Falenica 212,000
29 August 19, 1942 7,000 Otwock 219,000 To the transport was also included Jews from Miedzeszyn [9]
29 August 19, 1942 1,800 Rembertów 220,800
29 August 19, 1942 3,000 Jadwisin 223,800
29 August 19 (October 3 [9]), 1942 3,000 Radzymin 226,800 To the transport was also included Jews from Legionowo, Wołomin-Sosnówka and Tłuszcz [9]
29 August 19, 1942 2,200 Wołomin 229,000
29 August 19, 1942 0,700 Jadów 229,700
29 August 19, 1942 5,500 Parczew 235,200
30 August 20, 1942 4,000 Warsaw 239,200
30 August 20-26, 1942 21,000 Kielce 260,200 4 transports on: 20, 22, 24 and 26 August, each with 50 freight cars and two cars.
31 August 21, 1942 3,000 Warsaw 263,200
31 August 21, 1942 6,120 Mińsk Mazowiecki Ghetto closure 269,320
32 August 22, 1942 3,000 Warsaw 272,320
32 August 22, 1942 5,000 Siedlce 277,320
32 August 22, 1942 3,500 Łosice 280,820 At Łosice and Mordy there was also Jews from Sarnaki ghetto [9]
32 August 22, 1942 3,800 Mordy 284,620
33 August 23, 1942 3,000 Warsaw 287,620 Jankiel Wiernik
34 August 24, 1942 3,000 Warsaw 290,620
35 August 25, 1942 3,002 Warsaw 293,622 Abraham Krzepicki
35 August 25, 1942 5,500 Międzyrzec Podlaski Ghetto 299,122 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 562; Międzyrzec – Treblinka - 50 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
36 August 26, 1942 5,500 Międzyrzec Podlaski Ghetto 304,622 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 562; Międzyrzec – Treblinka - 50 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
36 August 26, 1942 3,000 Warsaw 307,622 Odilo Globocnik, Christian Wirth and Josef Oberhauser visit Treblinka. Irmfried Eberl is relieved of command.
37 August 27, 1942 2,454 Warsaw 310,076 53,750 Warsaw Jews have been deported in the past 15 days.[10]
38 August 28, 1942 unknown Łuków 310,076 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 565; Łuków – Treblinka. Odilo Globocnik temporarily suspends deportations to Treblinka. The gas chambers have continually broken down and the burial pits are overflowing with bodies. The SS resorts to shooting incoming Jews in the arrival area of the camp and piling bodies throughout the camp. In August, Globocnik orders Franz Stangl, commandant of Sobibor, to replace Dr. Irmfried Eberl as commandant of Treblinka. Stangl restores order in the camp and supervises the building of new gas chambers, which are operational in early autumn 1942. Transports of Warsaw and Radom Jews begin to arrive again in September 1942.[11]
41 August 31, 1942 Commandant Irmfried Eberl leaves Treblinka.
42 September 1, 1942 Franz Stangl becomes Commandant of Treblinka II. New, larger gas chambers have been erected to augment older chambers, and commence use. The new chambers are able to kill 12,000 to 15,000 victims every day,[12] with the maximum capacity of 22,000 executions in 24 hours.[13]
43 September 2, 1942 unknown Włoszczowa 310,076 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 566; Włoszczowa – Treblinka - 50 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
44 September 3, 1942 4,609 Warsaw 314,685 Boris Weinberg Warsaw deportations are restarted. New arrivals are processed the next morning.[14]
45 September 4, 1942 1,669 Warsaw 316,354
47 September 6, 1942 3,634 Warsaw 319,988
48 September 7, 1942 6,840 Warsaw 326,828
49 September 8, 1942 13,596 Warsaw 340,424
50 September 9, 1942 6,616 Warsaw 347,040
50 September 9, 1942 unknown Częstochowa Ghetto Pinchas Epstein
51 September 10, 1942 5,199 Warsaw 352,239
52 September 11, 1942 5,000 Warsaw 357,239 Jewish-Argentinean inmate Meir Berliner stabs SS-Oberscharführer Max Biala to death in a planned attack. Berliner is then executed by camp officers.
53 September 12, 1942 4,806 Warsaw 362,045 Patients from the hospital, together with medical and technical staff, arrived in Treblinka. Abraham Krzepicki escaped from Treblinka.
56 September 15, 1942 6,000 Kałuszyn 368,045 In the transport from Kałuszyn were also included Jews from Dobre, Latowicze and Stanisławów [9]
56 September 15 (or 27), 1942 1,000 Kołbiel 369,045 According to other sources, the Jews from Kołbiel were taken to the market square on September 27, formed into ranks and driven on foot to Pilawa, from where they were taken by train to the camp in Treblinka. [48]
56 September 15, 1942 1,000 Mrozy/Kuflew 370,045 To the transport was also included Jews from Cegłów [9]
56 September 15, 1942 700 Siennica 370,745
56 September 15, 1942 700 Stanisławów 371,445
56 September 15, 1942 1,000 Gniewoszów 372,445
57 September 16, 1942 6,000 Jędrzejów 378,445
57 September 16, 1942 1,500 Szczekociny 379,945
57 September 16, 1942 5,000 Włoszczowa 384,945
57 September 16, 1942 3,000 Wodzisław 387,945
62 September 21, 1942 1,000 Sędziszów 388,945 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 587; Sędziszów – Treblinka - 50 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
62 September 21, 1942 2,196 Warsaw 391,141 Jom Kipur - the end of the great displacement action in the Warsaw ghetto and the last transport. It includes Jewish police forced to help with deportations throughout Grossaktion Warsaw, and their families.[15]
62 September 21, 1942 2,500 Skarżysko-Kamienna 393,641
62 September 21, 1942 4,000 Suchedniów 397,641
62 September 22, 1942 sums to 40,000 Częstochowa 437,641 The first of six transports in frame of Fahrplananordnung No. 594 Czestochowa - Treblinka (each 58 freight cars and 2 passenger cars). The ghetto was emptied for three weeks, from September 21 to October 8, 1942. At that time, approximately 7,000 Jews were deported to Treblinka. Judenrat members were deported on October 4, 1942. [16] [44]
62 September 21 or 22, 1942 2,000 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 439,641 The transport, designated “Bo” (Train Da 83), departed from Theresienstadt on September 19, 1942 and was the first of a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). The transport was composed entirely of Jews who had been previously deported from Berlin, Cologne, Vienna and Munich. [17]
63 September 22, 1942 5,800 Sokołów Podlaski 445,441 During the action 1500-2000 people was killed in the ghetto. [9]
63 September 22, 1942 8,300 Węgrów 453,741 During the action 2000 people was killed in the ghetto. [9]
63 September 22, 1942 1,100 Kosów Lacki 454,841
63 September 22, 1942 1,100 Sterdyń 455,941
63 September 22, 1942 2,000 Stoczek 457,941
64 September 23, 1942 5,000 Szydłowiec 462,941 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 587 - 50 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
65 September 23 or 24, 1942 2,020 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 464,961 The transport, designated “Bp”, departed from Theresienstadt on September 21, 1942 and was the second in a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). The transport was composed entirely of Jews who had been deported earlier from Germany and Austria, among them over 1,000 deportees from Vienna. [18]
65 September 24, 1942 unknown Łochów 464,961 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 592
66 September 25, 1942 5,000 Szydłowiec 469,961 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 587 - 50 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
66 September 25, 1942 Czestochowa 469,961 The second of six transports from Czestochowa in frame of Fahrplananordnung nr 594
66 September 25 or 26, 1942 1,980 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 471,941 The transport, designated “Bq”, departed from Theresienstadt on September 23, 1942 and was the third in a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). The transport was composed entirely of Jews who had been deported earlier from Germany and Austria, among them 716 deportees from Vienna, 400 from Westphalia and 356 from Lower Silesia. [19]
67 September 26, 1942 5,000 Siedlce 476,941
67 September 26, 1942 4,800 Biała Podlaska 481,741
68 September 27, 1942 1,240 Łaskarzew 482,981
68 September 27, 1942 13,000 Kozienice 495,981 Fahrplananordnung Nr 587 - 50 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
69 September 28, 1942 Czestochowa 495,981 The third of six transports from Czestochowa in frame of Fahrplananordnung nr 594
69 September 28 or 29, 1942 2,004 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 497,985 The transport, designated “Br”, departed from Theresienstadt on September 26, 1942 and was the fourth in a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). The transport was composed entirely of Jews who had been deported earlier from Germany and Austria, among them 617 deportees from Vienna and 584 from Berlin.[20]
71 September 29, 1942 10,000 Zwoleń 507,985
72 October 1, 1942 Czestochowa 507,985 The fourth of six transports from Czestochowa in frame of Fahrplananordnung nr 594
72 October 1, 1942 2,000 Busko-Zdrój 509,985
72 October 1 or 6, 1942 8,000 Chmielnik 517,985
72 October 1, 1942 4,000 Nowy Korczyn 521,985
72 October 1, 1942 3,000 Pacanów 524,985
72 October 1, 1942 3,000 Pińczów 527,985
72 October 1, 1942 2,000 Radzyń 529,985
73 October 1 or 2, 1942 2,000 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 531,985 The transport, designated “Bs”, departed from Theresienstadt on September 29, 1942 and was the fifth in a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). The transport was composed entirely of Jews who had been deported earlier from Germany and Austria, among them 498 deportees from Vienna, 495 from Hesse-Nassau and 498 from Berlin. [21]
73 October 2, 1942 883 Darmstadt, Germany 532,868 Transport “Da 84” that left Darmstadt on September 30, 1942 included 883 Jews from 63 places from Rhine-Hesse and Upper Hesse regions. [22]
73 October 2, 1942 3,440 Parysów 536,308
73 October 2, 1942 3,680 Sobienie-Jeziory 539,988
73 October 2, 1942 1,640 Sobolew 541,628
73 October 2, 1942 10,000 Żelechów 551,628
75 October 4, 1942 Częstochowa Ghetto 551,628 The fifth of six transports from Czestochowa in frame of Fahrplananordnung nr 594
76 October 5, 1942 7,000 Łuków 558,628 Transports unnumbered. Oskar Strawczyński arrive from the Częstochowa Ghetto. He escape successfully during the uprising; Oskar wrote down his groundbreaking Ten Months in Treblinka in 1943 while in hiding with the Polish rescuers.[23][24][25]
77 October 6, 1942 800 Żarki 559,428
77 October 6, 1942 unknown Międzyrzec Podlaski Ghetto (Biała Podlaska, Konstantynów) 559,428 and also Jews from Biala Podlaska [26]; there were also Jews who came on foot from Konstantynów Podlaski [45]
78 October 7, 1942 Częstochowa Ghetto 559,428 The last of six transports from Czestochowa in frame of Fahrplananordnung nr 594
78 October 7, 1942 1,600 Koniecpol 561,028
78 October 7, 1942 2,000 Łagów 563,028
79 October 7 or 8, 1942 1,000 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 564,028 Richard Glazar, Karl Unger, Rudolf Masarek The transport, designated “Bt”, departed from Theresienstadt on October 5, 1942 and was the first in a series of two transports of relatively young individuals to Treblinka. The transport was composed almost entirely of Jews who had been deported in the previous month from Ostrava in the Protectorate.[27]]
81 October 10, 1942 14,000 Radomsko 578,028 Zygmunt Strawczyński arrives in transport from Radomsko. Both with his brother Oskar successfully escape during the uprising. [23][24][25]
82 October 11, 1942 11,000 Ostrowiec Świętokrzyski 589,028
82 October 10 or 11, 1942 1,000 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 590,028 The transport, designated “Bu”, departed from Theresienstadt on October 8, 1942 and was the second in a series of two transports of relatively young individuals to Treblinka. The transport was composed entirely of Jews who had been deported from the Protectorate, among them 597 who arrived in Theresienstadt on the previous month. [28]
86 October 15, 1942 22,000 Piotrków Ghetto 612,028 The "Aktion" at Piotrków lasted for eight days beginning October 14, 1942. The total of 22,000 prisoners were split into four transports which included Jews expelled to Piotrków from Kamieńsk, Przygłów, Sulejów, Srock, Tuszyn, Wolborz and Rozprza. They did not arrive at Treblinka in one day. Among them were Jews from Bełchatów, Kalisz, Gniezno and Płock also deported to Piotrków.[29]
86 October 15, 1942 1,500 Gozdowice, German Reich 613,528
86 October 15, 1942 500 Kamieńsk 614,028 Old gas chambers cease operation and are replaced with new. Meanwhile, mass deportations from Bezirk Bialystok had just begun, and continue until February 19, 1943. In the next four months over 110,000 Jews from Bialystok General District (which includes Nazi counties of Bialystok Land, Bielsk, Grajewo, Grodno, Łomża, Sokółka, and Wolkowysk) are deported to Treblinka and annihilated.[30]
86 October 15, 1942 2,000 Przygłów 616,028
86 October 15, 1942 1,500 Sulejów 617,528
86 October 15, 1942 4,500 Starachowice 622,028 Some sources say that the transport from Starachowice-Wierzbnik was on October 27, 1942.
86 October 15, 1942 4,000 Chotcza Nowa 626,028
86 October 15, 1942 600 Ciepielów 626,628
86 October 15, 1942 2,000 Iłża 628,628
86 October 15, 1942 3,000 Lipsko 631,628
86 October 15, 1942 2,000 Sienno 633,628
86 October 15, 1942 7,000 Tarłów 640,628
86 October 15, 1942 4,000 Wierzbnik, German Reich 644,628
86 October 15, 1942 1,600 Iwaniska 646,228
86 October 15, 1942 3,300 Ciechanowice, German Reich 649,528
88 October 17 or 18, 1942 1,998 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 651,526 The transport, designated “Bv”, departed from Theresienstadt on October 15, 1942 and was the sixth of a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). On board were 1,998 inmates of Theresienstadt. The transport was composed entirely of Jews who had been previously deported from the Protectorate, among them 916 from Prague and 474 from Brno. [31]
91 October 20, 1942 6,500 Opatów, getto 658,026 Samuel Willenberg
92 October 21 or 22, 1942 1,984 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 660,010 Aron Gelbard escapes. The transport, designated “Bw”, departed from Theresienstadt on October 19, 1942 and was the seventh of a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). On board were 1,984 inmates of Theresienstadt. The transport was composed almost entirely of Jews who had been previously deported from the Protectorate, among them 1,383 from Prague and 263 from Brno. [32]
92 October 21, 1942 15,000 Tomaszów Mazowiecki 675,010
93 October 22, 1942 4,000 Biała Rawska 679,010
93 October 22, 1942 2,000 Orszewice 681,010
93 October 22, 1942 3,000 Koluszki 684,010
93 October 22, 1942 3,000 Nowe Miasto nad Pilicą 687,010
93 October 22, 1942 3,000 Opoczno 690,010
93 October 22, 1942 4,000 Przysucha 694,010
95 October 24 or 25, 1942 2,018 Terezín Ghetto, Czechoslovakia 696,028 The transport, designated “Bx”, departed from Theresienstadt on October 22, 1942 and was the last in a series of eight transports of sick and elderly Jews (“Alterstransporte”). On board were 2,018 inmates of Theresienstadt. The transport was composed almost entirely of Jews who had been previously deported from the Protectorate, among them 987 from Prague and 579 from Ostrava. [33]
96 October 25, 1942 500 Osiek 696,528
102 October 31, 1942 4,000 Rawa Mazowiecka 700,528
102 October 31, 1942 2,000 Żarnów 702,528
102 October 31, 1942 800 Ujazd, German Reich 703,328
102 October 31, 1942 900 Ćmielów 704,228
102 October 31, 1942 500 Kunów 704,728
102 October 31, 1942 1,600 Koprzywnica 706,328
102 October 31, 1942 4,500 Ożarów 710,828
104 November 2, 1942 4,330 Siemiatycze [34] 715,158 In that transport there was also Jews from Drohiczyn [35]
105 November 3, 1942 9,000 Końskie 724,158
105 November 3, 1942 1,000 Gowarczów 725,158
105 November 3, 1942 4,000 Radoszyce 729,158
107 November 5, 1942 5,000 Stopnica 734,158
109 November 7, 1942 6,000 Staszów 740,158
109 November 7, 1942 3,000 Łuków 743,158
109 November 10, 1942 Mława 743,138 The old and the sick were deported to Treblinka [46]. Jews from other towns were also added to the transport. There were passenger carriages in the transport. [47]
112 November 10, 1942 1,300 Goniądz 744,458 Liquidation of Kielbasin Sammellagger transit camp outside Grodno in the Bezirk Bialystok District, commencing deportation action of up to 28,000 Jews expelled and imprisoned at Kielbasin from 22 surrounding cities and towns of the two sub-districts including Sokolka. The transports arriving at Treblinka started on November 10, 1942 and continued until December 15 for over a month (they did not arrive in one day). The Jews brought for gassing in trains from Kielbasin originated from the following settlements: Goniądz, Trzcianne, Augustów, Grajewo, Rajgród, Szczuczyn, Druskieniki, Jeziory, Lunna, Ostryna, Porzecze, Skidel, Sopockinie, Dąbrowa, Indura, Janow, Krynki, Kuźnica, Korycin, Odelsk, Sidra, Sokółka, Suchowola, and the Grodno Ghetto. Some 9,100 victims among them came from the Borgusze transit camp nearby.[36][37]
112 November 10, 1942 1,200 Trzcianne 745,658
112 November 10, 1942 2,000 Augustów 747,658
112 November 10, 1942 2,500 Grajewo 750,158
112 November 10, 1942 600 Rajgród 750,758
112 November 10, 1942 1,500 Szczuczyn 752,258
112 November 10, 1942 500 Druskininkai, now Lithuania 752,758
112 November 10, 1942 2,000 Jeziory 754,758
112 November 10, 1942 1,500 Lunna 756,258
112 November 10, 1942 2,000 Ostrynka 758,258
112 November 10, 1942 1,000 Porzecze 759,258
112 November 10, 1942 3,000 Skidal 762,258
112 November 10, 1942 2,000 Sapotskin, now Belarus 764,258
112 November 10, 1942 1,000 Dąbrowa Białostocka 765,258
112 November 10, 1942 2,500 Indura 767,758
112 November 10, 1942 950 Janów 768,708
112 November 10, 1942 5,000 Krynki 773,708
112 November 10, 1942 1,000 Kuźnica 774,708
112 November 10, 1942 1,000 Korycin 775,708
112 November 10, 1942 500 Odelsk 776,208
112 November 10, 1942 350 Sidra 776,558
112 November 10, 1942 8,000 Sokółka 784,558
112 November 10, 1942 5,100 Suchowola 789,658
112 November 10, 1942 1,500 Grodno Ghetto, now Belarus 791,158
112 November 10, 1942 850 Jałówka 792,008 Liquidation of Volkovysk transit camp. Deportation of up to 16,300 Jews imprisoned temporarily. Similar to the Sammellagger in Kielbasin, the transports began on November 10, 1942 and continued until December 15, 1942 for over a month (none of them arrived in one day). The Jews brought to Treblinka from Volkovysk camp originated from the ghettos in the following settlements: Jałówka, Lyskow, Mosty, Porozow, Roś, Różana, Swislocz, Wolkovysk, and Wolpa.[38]
112 November 10, 1942 600 Łysków 792,608
112 November 10, 1942 350 Mosty 792,958
112 November 10, 1942 1,000 Porozów 793,958
112 November 10, 1942 1,000 Ros 794,958
112 November 10, 1942 3,000 Różana 797,958
112 November 10, 1942 3,000 Swisłocz, obecnie Białoruś 800,958
112 November 10, 1942 7,000 Wołkowysk, obecnie Białoruś 807,958
112 November 10, 1942 1,500 Wołpa 809,458
117 November 15, 1942 1,000 Gniewoszów 810,458
122 November 20, 1942 40 aut Biała Podlaska 810,458 From the communiqué published in January 1943 by the Office of Information of the underground Armia Krajowa, based on the observation of locked freight trains passing through with prisoners destined for Treblinka. Meanwhile, 35 cars with goods were sent to the Third Reich on the way back in five days.[39]
123 November 21, 1942 40 aut Białystok 810,458 In these transports there will be also Jews from Knyszyn, Michałowice, Zabłudów, and much more little towns. [40]
124 November 22, 1942 40 aut Białystok 810,458
126 November 24, 1942 40 aut Grodno 810,458
132 November 30, 1942 1,700 Siedlce 812,158
149 December 17, 1942 unknown Prostken (Ostpreussen) 812,158 Train no Pj. 39 - 37 cars
163 December 31, 1942 According to the SS-Sturmbannführer Hermann Höfle's Telegram, the cumulative total of deportees to this date was 713,555, and 10,335 had been deported during the two weeks previous to this date. Substantial quantity of November deportations is not in the report.[41]
163 December 31, 1942 Escape from the Totenlager (extermination area) via a tunnel. Only Lazar Sharson successfully escapes.
169 January 6, 1943 4,000 Radomsko 816,158
173 January 10, 1943 6,000 Sandomierz 822,158
176 January 13, 1943 1,500 Radom, getto 823,658
176 January 13, 1943 5,000 Szydłowiec 828,658 Train no Pkr. 9110 - 60 cars
181 January 18, 1943 1,200 Warszawa 829,858
181 January 18, 1943 1,600 Grodno Ghetto, now Belarus 831,458 First stage of Grodno Ghetto liquidation under Kriminalkommissar Heinz Errelis who personally shoots at least 100. Over the course of 5 days, dubbed by the Jews "Operation 10,000" results in a total of some 10,000 Jews sent mostly to Auschwitz through Kielbasin Sammellagger transit camp nearby.[42]
182 January 19, 1943 1,200 Warsaw 832,658 .
183 January 20, 1943 1,200 Warsaw 833,858
184 January 21, 1943 1,200 Warsaw 835,058
185 January 22, 1943 1,200 Warsaw 836,258
188 January 25, 1943 2,200 Jasionówka 838,458
203 February 9, 1943 2,000 Białystok Ghetto 840,458 Fahrplananordnung Nr 552; Białystok – Treblinka - 21 passenger cars
204 February 10, 1943 2,000 Białystok Ghetto 842,458 Fahrplananordnung Nr 552; Białystok – Treblinka - 21 passenger cars
205 February 11, 1943 2,000 Białystok Ghetto 844,458 Fahrplananordnung Nr 552; Białystok – Treblinka - 21 passenger cars
206 February 12, 1943 2,000 Białystok Ghetto 846,458 Fahrplananordnung Nr 552; Białystok – Treblinka - 21 passenger cars
207 February 13, 1943 2,000 Białystok Ghetto 848,458 Fahrplananordnung Nr 552; Białystok – Treblinka - 21 passenger cars
208 February 14, 1943 4,400 Grodno Ghetto, Belarus 852,858 Fahrplananordnung Nr. 552; Grodno – Treblinka. Final liquidation of the Ghetto, dubbed "Operation 5,000." Victims are sent in three trains agreed on January 15, 1943 by Berlin. An additional train, Pj 165, leaves Grodno for Treblinka on February 16.[42]
233 March 11, 1943 Bulgarian military and police authorities transfer 11,343 Jews from the Bulgarian-occupied Thrace, Macedonia and (Serbian) Pirot to German custody pursuant to a February agreement between the SS and representatives of the Bulgarian government. German SS and police officials deport these Jews to Treblinka, where almost all are gassed or shot upon arrival.[11] [43]
244 March 22, 1943 2,338 Skopje, Bulgaria 855,196
247 March 25, 1943 2,402 Skopje, Bulgaria 857,598 Train no Da. 102 from Vienna - 25 passenger cars
248 March 26, 1943 857,598 Fahrplananordnung Nr 567; Transport from German Reich. Train no Da.101 from Tesaloniki? - 46 passenger cars
249 March 27, 1943 857,598 Fahrplananordnung Nr 567; Transport from German Reich 2 trains - 40 passenger cars each, March 27 and 28. It's possible that these transport are mentioned in other lines.
250 March 28, 1943 1,485 Kavalla, Macedonia (together with Jews from Thasos i Eleftheroupoli) 859,083 Route: Kavalla (March 7, 1943) - Drama - Sidirokastro - Simitli - Gorna Dzhumaya - Lom - Vienna (March 21) - from Lom to Vienna by ship
250 March 28, 1943 607 Drama, Macedonia 860,690 Route: Drama (March 5-6, 1943) - Sidirokastro - Simitli - Gorna Dzhumaya - Lom - Vienna (from Lom to Vienna by ship)
250 March 28, 1943 500 Seres, Macedonia (together with Jerws from Nea Zichni) 860,190 Route: Seres (March 5, 1943) - Sidirokastro - Simitli - Gorna Dzhumaya - Lom- Vienna (from Lom to Vienna by ship)
250 28 marca 1943 927 Komotini, Thrace (together with Jews from Alexandroupolis) 861,117 Route: Alexandroupolis (March 5, 1943) - Sidirokastro - Simitli - Dupnitsa - Lom - Vienna (from Lom to Vienna by ship)
250 28 marca 1943 538 Xanthi, Thrace 861,655 Route: Xanthi (March 7, 1943) - Sidirokastro - Simitli - Dupnitsa - Lom - Vienna (from Lom to Vienna by ship)
251 March 29, 1943 2,404 Skopje, Bulgaria 864,059 Train no Da.102 - 44 passenger cars
253 April 1, 1943 Skopje, Bulgaria 864,059 Train no Da.203 - 19 passenger cars
272 April 19, 1943 7,000 Warsaw 871,059 Result of the Warsaw Ghetto Uprising
283 May 1, 1943 Węgrów 871,059 Berek Lajcher, Treblinka revolt leader Final Wegrów Ghetto liquidation
377 August 2, 1943 Treblinka revolt erupts. Some 300 prisoners performing forced labor – aware that the SS will soon kill them – stage an uprising after the initial date of the revolt set for June 15 was postponed due to grenade detonation at the undressing area. Prisoners quietly seize weapons from the camp armory, set fire to barracks, and storm the main gate. Hundreds attempt to climb the barbed-wire fence, but the SS with Trawniki guards kill two-thirds of them with machine-gun fire. Less than a hundred escape successfully, chased in cars and on horses. Camp deportations and gassing operations halt the following month.[11]
393 August 18, 1943 Białystok Ghetto Result of the Białystok Ghetto Uprising.
396 August 21, 1943 7,600 Białystok Ghetto 878.659 [10]Fahrplananordnung Nr. 290; Bialystok – Treblinka. 2 trains (Pj. 207 and Pj. 208) - each 38 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
397 August 22, 1943 Białystok Ghetto 878.659 [10]Fahrplananordnung Nr. 290; Bialystok – Treblinka. 2 trains (Pj. 209 and Pj. 210) - each 38 freight cars and 2 passenger cars
398 August 23, 1943 Białystok Ghetto 878.659+ [10]Fahrplananordnung Nr. 290; Bialystok – Treblinka. 1 trains (Pj. 211) - 38 freight cars and 2 passenger cars. Last Jewish transport to Treblinka. All of the deportees on the transport were killed upon arrival.[11]

 


References
[1]a b c Clancy Young, Treblinka Death Camp Day-by-Day” H.E.A.R.T – Holocaust Education & Archive Research Team. Tables with record of daily deportations. Dostęp 5 listopada 2015.
[2] Arad, Yitzhak. Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka Indiana University Press, Bloomington and Indianapolis, 1987.
[3] Gutman, IsraelThe Jews of Warsaw 1939–43. The Harvester Press, Brighton, 1982.
[4] Biuletyn Głównej Komisji Badania Zbrodni Hitlerowskich W Polsce – Wydawnictwo Prawnicze, 1960.
[5] Donat, AlexanderThe Death Camp Treblinka. Holocaust Library, New York, 1979.
[6] Friedländer, Saul. The Years of Extermination: Nazi Germany and the Jews, 1939-1945 (2007). Page 430.
[7] Abraham Lewin. A Cup of Tears: A Diary of the Warsaw Ghetto, ed. Antony Polonsky (Oxford, 1988), p. 148. [wyd. polskie: Abraham Lewin, Dziennik, ŻIH 2016].
[8] Marek Edelman, The Warsaw Ghetto Uprising.
[9] J.A. Młynarczyk, “Akcja Reinhardt” w gettach prowincjonalnych dystryktu warszawskiego 1942-1943. [w:] Prowincja. Noc, IFIS PAN 2007.
[10] Jewish Virtual Library, Chronology of Jewish Persecution: 1942 West Bloomfield, MI. Source: Holocaust Memorial Center.
[11] a b c d e Treblinka: Chronology.
[12] Treblinka Death Camp, with photographs, Ounsdale, PDF (2.2 MB).
[13] David E. Sumler, A history of Europe in the twentieth century. Dorsey Press, ISBN 0-256-01421-3.
[14] a b Arad, Yitzhak. Ibidem. Page 97.
[15] 
BBC History of World War II. Auschwitz; Inside the Nazi State. Part 3, Factories of Death.
[16] Robert Kuwalek and Carmelo Lisciotto (2007)“Czestochowa”H.E.A.R.T. HolocaustResearchProject.org. Retrieved 10 May 2014. By June 1942 the ghetto’s population had increased to around 40-50,000.Emil Kerenji (2014). Jewish Responses to Persecution: 1942–1943. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 46, 53, 76/77. ISBN 1442236272. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
[17] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[18] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[19] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[20] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[21] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[22] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[23] Emil Kerenji (2014)Jewish Responses to Persecution: 1942–1943. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 46, 53, 76/77. ISBN 1442236272. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
[24] ARC (22 April 2006).“Strawczynski / Strawczynski, Oscar, Zygmunt, Guta and Abus”. Treblinka Roll of Remembrance. DeathCamps.org. Retrieved 21 December 2014.
[25] Oscar Strawczynski (1943). “Ten Months in Treblinka! The Oscar Strawczynski Story”. H.E.A.R.T 2009. HolocaustResearchProject.org. Retrieved 21 December2014.
[26] AŻIH rel. 301/71
[27] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[28] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[29] H.E.A.R.T (2007)“Piotrkow Trybunalski: The First Ghetto in Occupied Poland”. HolocaustResearchProject.org. Retrieved May 10, 2014.
[30] Yitzhak Arad (1999)Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka: The Operation Reinhard Death CampsIndiana University Press.p. 134. ISBN0-253-21305-3. Retrieved July 5, 2011.
[31] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[32] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[33] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[34] From the second transport from Siemiatycze (there were two – 2 and 7 November 1942) 152 men were sent to work at the Treblinka I labor camp. Survived two. (See Miriam Kuperhand and Saul Kuperhand, Shadows of Treblinka, ed. University of Illinois Press 1998, s. 109).
[35]  AŻIH, rel.  301/1256
[36] a b “Kielbasin Transit Camp”. Cities and Towns Where Those in Kielbasin Came From. 2014 Geni.com. Retrieved 9 May 2014.
[37] a b Arad, pp. 392-395“Kelbasin: November 10 – December 15, 1942 (38,900 victims)”Deportatitions to Treblinka From The Generalgouvernement and Bialystok General District. KehilaLinks.JewishGen.org – Information about the Deportation Statistics. Retrieved 9 May 2014.
[38] “The German occupation – 4: temporary camp outside the city of Wolkowysk”. Liquidation of the Ghettos and the Deportations to the Camps (November 2, 1942—March 12, 1942). Lost Jewish Worlds. Retrieved 9 May 2014.
[39] a b Yitzhak Arad (1999), p.356.
[40] The People vs. Kurt Wiese and Heinz Errelis Accused of Murder. Verdict and Judgment. Cologne District Court, Federal Republic of Germany, June 27, 1968. See: “Operation 10,000” in chapter “Deportation of Jews from Grodno”.
[41] Excerpts from the Bielefelf Trial. Final Verdict. Cologne District Court, Federal Republic of Germany, 1968. See: “Operation 5,000” in chapter “The Final Liquidation and Removal, February 1943”.
[42]  AŻIH, rel. 301/1276
[43] Yad Vashem – The World Holocaust Remembrance Center
[44] Document Fahrplananordnung nr 594, Generaldirektion der Ostbahn (Cracow, 21 of September 1942).
The train ran on the Częstochowa-Treblinka route. He left Częstochowa on 22.09, 25.09, 28.09, 1.10, 4.10 and 7.10 at 12:29 and through Koluszki, Warsaw and Małkinia it reached Treblinka the next day at 5:25. He returned the next day at 10:10, reaching Częstochowa at 0:19.
[45] Meir Garbarz Grover, Yizkor to Jewish Konstantynow Podlaski, 218, p. 5
[46] https://sztetl.org.pl/en/towns/m/584-mlawa/99-history/137690-history-of-community
[47]
USC VHA 1418 – Beno Benari. Benari was in this transport and he managed to jump off the train along with 6 other Jews. He rode in a passenger car.
[48] Memoirs of Jan Ciszkowski [in:] Nasza Kołbiel 2/2019,s. 20